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TACNY Sweet Lecture – Effective Speaking And How To Avoid Death By PowerPoint – Tuesday, November 8

Friday, November 4th, 2011

Greetings fellow astrophiles!

A TACNY (Technology Alliance of CNY, of which the SAS is a member organization) Sweet Lecture (not to be directly confused with a sweet TACNY Lecture) is happening on the OCC campus this coming Tuesday (November 8). Information from the TACNY website for “Effective Speaking and How to Avoid Death by PowerPoint” is provided below.

Direct Link: www.tacny.org/home/ctl/viewdetail/mid/1903/itemid/728/d/20111108.aspx


“Effective Speaking and How to Avoid Death by PowerPoint”

Tuesday, November 8, 2011 – 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Mawhinney Hall, Room 345 at Onondaga Community College

Speaker: Diana Wolgemuth, a training consultant with Dale Carnegie in Syracuse, is the featured speaker.

Talk Overview:

The Technology Alliance of Central New York (TACNY) will host an exciting presentation on professional speaking techniques as part of TACNY’s 2011-2012 Sweet Lecture Series. “Effective Speaking and How to Avoid Death by PowerPoint” is scheduled for Tuesday, November 8, 2011 at 6 pm. Diana Wolgemuth, a training consultant with Dale Carnegie in Syracuse, is the featured speaker. The event will be held at Mawhinney Hall, Room 345 at Onondaga Community College.

This free event is open to the public and is part of TACNY’s Sweet Lecture Series. Ms. Wolgemuth has been a training consultant locally for several years. Prior to her tenure with Dale Carnegie, she was the Learning and Development Manager at Hand Held Products (known today as Honeywell) in Skaneateles for seven years. Her presentation will include:

– Steps for Preparing Your Presentation
– How to Read Your Audience and Keep Them Engaged
– Best Practices for Using Power Point.

This lecture will certainly benefit anyone that needs to step in front of an audience in a professional setting.

Snacks and light refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to sweet.lecture@tacny.org. Walk-ins are also welcome.

We look forward to seeing you there – please pass the word!

www.tacny.org/home/ctl/viewdetail/mid/1903/itemid/728/d/20111108.aspx

TACNY Junior Café Scientifique – “Creepy Chemistry” – Saturday, October 15, 9:30 a.m.

Tuesday, October 11th, 2011

Greetings fellow astrophiles!

With a bit more advanced notice than the last lecture, TACNY is hosting a Junior Café Scientifique lecture at the MOST this Saturday morning at 9:30 a.m. Information is below. The SAS will also be hosting one of these lectures on May 19, 2012!


Creepy Chemistry: Glowing Pumpkins, Magical Genies, Mysterious Fog and Much More!

Saturday, October 15, 2011 – 9:30a.m. – 11:00a.m.

Milton J. Rubenstein Museum of Science & Technology (MOST), Armory Square Syracuse, New York

Speaker: Neal M. Abrams, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry.

Talk Overview: Ready to be spooked out of your seat? Join the TACNY Jr. Café on October 15th to see the chemistry behind glowing pumpkins, magical genies, bleeding paper, and mysterious fog. Dr. Neal Abrams from SUNY ESF will present a series of interactive Halloween chemistry demonstrations that will be sure to delight young and old alike. Come make your own slimy worms and celebrate the season!

Biography: Dr. Neal Abrams obtained his bachelor’s degree in chemistry and certification in teaching from Ithaca College, completed his doctorate at Penn State University, and was a postdoctoral researcher at Cornell University. At ESF, Neal instructs the general chemistry labs and co-teaches a course in renewable energy. He also directs a chemistry research program centered on renewable energy and is the faculty advisor for the ESF chemistry club.

About the Technology Alliance of Central New York (“TACNY”):

Founded in 1903 as the Technology Club of Syracuse, the Technology Alliance of Central New York enhances and facilitates the development, growth and advancement of education, awareness and historical appreciation of technology within the Central New York Community. Through its programs and support efforts, TACNY seeks to further serve members, as well as educational groups and institutions with similar missions, and be the key link among technical societies in Central New York.

TACNY Jr. Café Scientifique, founded in 2005, is free, held most 3rd Saturdays, from September to June from 9:30a.m. – 11:00a.m. at the MOST. Participants must be accompanied by an adult and can explore the museum at no cost at the program conclusion.

Reservations are appreciated but not required two days prior to event:

Diane E. Darwish at jrcafe@tacny.org – www.tacny.org

TACNY Sweet Lecture At OCC On Nanotechnology – TODAY – Tuesday, October 11 at 6:00 p.m.

Tuesday, October 11th, 2011

Greetings fellow astrophiles!

While not directly astronomy-related (unless you consider the materials science and physics connections for making better coatings, components, circuitry for GO-TO scopes, etc.), we will be posting lecture announcements from the TACNY – Technology Alliance of Central New York (tacny.org) – listserve to promote some of the best public lecturing on science and technology one can find in CNY. This lecture (and apologies for the short-notice) at the Whitney Applied Technology Center on the Onondaga Community College campus (PDF map available for download HERE – look for the Cassiopeia, er, “W” on the map) features Dr. Alain Kaloyeros of the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at SUNY Albany. One can get a look at his perspective on a syracuse.com article available HERE (and, as is regretfully the case on some syracuse.com posts, please ignore the comment section).


Nanotechnology: Driving a 21st Century Educational and Economic Renaissance in NYS

TACNY and the Tech Garden will host “Nanotechnology: Driving a 21st Century Educational and Economic Renaissance in NYS” on Tuesday, October 11, 2011 at 6 pm at the Whitney Applied Technology Center at OCC. The featured speaker is Dr. Alain Kaloyeros, Senior Vice President and CEO, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) of the University at Albany-SUNY.

This free event is open to the public and is part of TACNY’s Sweet Lecture Series.

Dr. Kaloyeros is a key player in the development and implementation of New York’s high-tech strategy to become a global leader in the nanotechnology-driven economy of the 21st century. CNSE has generated over $7 billion in public and private investments, including more than $6 billion from the federal government and the international nanoelectronics industry. Dr. Kaloyeros will provide an overview of nanotechnology and will describe regional initiatives, including CNSE’s partnership with Lockheed Martin and CenterState CEO to develop the Nanotechnology Innovation and Commercialization Excelerator (NICE).

Dr. Kaloyeros is a past recipient of the National Science Foundation’s Presidential Young Investigator Award, as well as a number of other awards from organizations throughout the technology and business communities.

Snacks and light refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to sweet.lecture@tacny.org. Walk-ins are also welcome.

We look forward to seeing you there – please pass the word!

David Bishop Lecture WILL HAPPEN Tonight, 7:00 p.m. (Friday, Sept 23) – September Newsletter – UARS Update

Friday, September 23rd, 2011

Greetings fellow astrophiles,

In rapid succession!

1. David Bishop Lecture

The weather this weekend is expected to go from bad to worse tomorrow evening, with more severe rain predicted for Saturday afternoon. While tonight will very-very likely not be good for observing, the chance for rain is less than predicted for tomorrow, so we will be hosting David Bishop at Darling Hill this evening for a year-in-review astronomy lecture.

As I’ve mentioned before, David used to make the yearly pilgrimage to Darling Hill for this lecture and they were always well-attended and informative. We are delighted to have David back and the board and I are looking forward to his lecture tonight!

September Newsletter

The September newsletter is up for download HERE. Included in the newsletter is a brief summary about our 2011 Summer Seminar.

UARS Update From NASA

For those paying attention to the imminent demise of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, check out the NASA website www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/uars for updates. The trajectory has changed since the last estimate and, while it should not be of any concern to North America, it is an event of global importance (as it will happen again).

Fall Object Planning Post – Comet Elenin (C/2010 X1)

Saturday, May 14th, 2011

From the linked article at www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-135…auid=8291526:

“This comet may not put on a great show. Just as certainly, it will not cause any disruptions here on Earth. But there is a cause to marvel,” said Yeomans. “This intrepid little traveler will offer astronomers a chance to study a relatively young comet that came here from well beyond our solar system’s planetary region. After a short while, it will be headed back out again, and we will not see or hear from Elenin for thousands of years. That’s pretty cool.”


The path of Comet Elenin, from NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Interim Secretary and longtime Board Member Mike Brady sent along the following link about Comet Elenin (C/2010 X1) recently to help us begin to plan our fall observing sessions. There have been a half-dozen-or-so comets observed through the eyepieces of the 16″ Cave at Darling Hill in the past three years, a few difficult to find from Constellation guides alone and a few nearly impossible without a piece of paper with the slight fraction of the comet’s elliptical path marked out.

By some accounts, Elenin will be a bit of a struggle for Darling Hill, but at least one blog post reports it may be a pleasant object for morning observing (and who’s going to doubt Astro Bob given how good Barlow Bob and Barefoot Bob do for the SAS?). Check out Astro Bob’s post on Elenin at astrobob.areavoices.com/2010/12/28/bright-comet-prospect-for-2011/.

Depending on which websites you read, Elenin will either collide violently with Earth or pass by quietly. Given the differences in the scientific quality of those pages stating both possibilities, I suspect I’ll not plan on cancelling the November 2011 Public Viewing session at this point.

And furthermore(!), if you’re looking for a bit more information about what 2011 brings in terms of Comet hunting, the PDF linked at www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds/preds11.pdf provides a nice summary to begin a little google searching before dragging your scopes out.