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Archive for the 'Student Interest' Category

Junior Café Scientifique – Under The Sea: Life Aboard A Submarine – Saturday, June 16

Thursday, June 14th, 2012

Greetings fellow astrophiles!

A TACNY-hosted (Technology Alliance of CNY, of which the SAS is a member organization) Junior Café Scientifique lecture at the MOST is happening on Saturday June 16 at 9:30 a.m.


NOTE: This is the last Junior Cafe of the 2011-12 program year. They’ll be back in September!

When: Saturday, June 16, 9:30-11:00am
Where: Milton J Rubenstein Museum of Science & Technology (MOST), Syracuse NY

Enrique “Henry” Sanchez, a consultant at ANTMAR Consulting and former member of the U.S. Navy’s submarine force, will present Under the Sea: Life Aboard a Submarine, a talk about submarines, as part of TACNY’s 2011-2012 Junior Cafe Scientifique lecture series.

People interested in learning more about submarines are invited to attend the free Junior Cafe presentation on Saturday, June 16, 2012, from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Milton J. Rubenstein Museum of Science and Technology (MOST) in Syracuse’s Armory Square. Walk-ins are welcome, but we ask that people RSVP by emailing jrcafe@tacny.org by June 14, 2012.

Sanchez retired from the U.S. Navy in 1994 after twenty years of service, including four deployments to the Western Pacific/Indian Ocean/Persian Gulf regions. He was awarded the Navy Commendation Medal, Navy Achievement Medal, Meritorious Unit Commendation, and the New York State Conspicuous Service Medal. After retiring, Sanchez worked for Acquisition Planning Corp., in Washington, D.C., and then Lockheed Martin, where he worked in a number of engineering, functional and program management positions. He currently serves on the board of directors of the Technology Alliance of Central New York and is a past board member of Leadership Greater Syracuse and the Spanish Action League of Onondaga County. He has been honored as a YWCA Academy of Diversity Achiever and is a graduate of Leadership Greater Syracuse.

If you have ever wanted to know how a submarine works or what it’s like inside, this is your chance. This submarine presentation, geared towards middle-school students, will take you through the complex world of submarines. You will learn about the history of submarines, types of submarines, how they are built, what it takes to be a submariner, the types of people who work on submarines, and watch some fascinating short videos.

TACNY Junior Cafe Scientifique, a program for middle-school students, features discussions between scientists and students about topics in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics in an informal atmosphere and seeks to encourage students to consider careers in these areas. Students must be accompanied by an adult and can explore the MOST at no cost after the event.

For more information about TACNY, visit www.tacny.org.

Junior Café Scientifique – Antarctica Before the Ice: How Global Climate Change Affects Marine Ecology – Saturday, March 10

Tuesday, March 6th, 2012

Greetings fellow astrophiles!

A TACNY-hosted (Technology Alliance of CNY, of which the SAS is a member organization) Junior Café Scientifique lecture at the MOST is happening on Saturday March 10 at 9:30 a.m. Information is below.

When: Saturday, March 10, 9:30-11:00am (NOTE: not the usual third Saturday of the month)
Where: Milton J Rubenstein Museum of Science & Technology (MOST), Syracuse NY

Linda C. Ivany, an associate professor of earth sciences at Syracuse University, will present Antarctica Before the Ice: How Global Climate Change Affects Marine Ecology, a talk about the threat of global warming to Antarctica, as part of TACNY’s 2011-2012 Junior Cafe Scientifique lecture series.People interested in learning more about the impact of global warming are invited to attend the free Junior Cafe presentation on Saturday, March 10, 2012, from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Milton J. Rubenstein Museum of Science and Technology (MOST) in Syracuse’s Armory Square. Walk-ins are welcome, but we ask that people RSVP by emailing jrcafe@tacny.org by March 8, 2012.

Linda C. Ivany, PhD, is an associate professor of earth sciences at Syracuse University. She received her bachelor’s degree from Syracuse University, her master’s degree from the University of Florida, and her doctorate from Harvard University. She was a Michigan Society Fellow at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor for three years before moving to Syracuse in 2000. Ivany is a paleontologist and paleoclimatologist, using fossils to understand ancient environments, ecology, and climate change. She lives in Earlville on a farm with a multitude of animals.

Antarctica was not always covered in ice. Fifty million years ago, it was lush and forested, and the waters offshore were warm and teaming with life. As climate cooled, predators were eliminated from the marine ecosystem, resulting in the unique and fragile fauna that lives near the ice today. But global warming is threatening that ecosystem. If the water warms enough to allow predators to reinvade, the entire ecosystem will be changed forever. Learn more by attending Dr. Ivany’s talk.

TACNY Junior Cafe Scientifique, a program for middle-school students, features discussions between scientists and students about topics in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics in an informal atmosphere and seeks to encourage students to consider careers in these areas. Students must be accompanied by an adult and can explore the MOST at no cost after the event.

For more information about TACNY, visit www.tacny.org.

New York Center for Astrobiology – 2012 Astrobiology Short Story Contest

Wednesday, February 8th, 2012

Greetings (younger) fellow astrophiles!

I am pleased to announce that the New York Center for Astrobiology is sponsoring a writing contest for 9th – 12th graders. A brief overview of the contest is below, with the complete list of rules, story proposals, and lots of extraterrestrial parameters included in the linked PDF you can find at:

www.origins.rpi.edu/astrobiologycontestfinalversion.pdf

NOTE: I urge you to have wikipedia open as you read the two plots. Some good explanations and a whole lot of potential inspiration lies within!

This contest is sponsored by the New York Center for Astrobiology, a member of NASA’s Astrobiology Institute program, headquartered at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY. The New York Center for Astrobiology at RPI also involves scientists at the University at Albany (SUNY), Syracuse University, and the University at Arizona. The multi-disciplinary team of scientists from these four institutions is working to better understand the origin and distribution of life on Earth and on other planets in the Galaxy. For more information about the New York Center for Astrobiology, please visit its website at www.origins.rpi.edu

Prizes

> An award ceremony will occur in early May 2012 for students, teachers, and parents with scientists and high school teachers associated with the New York Center for Astrobiology

> $200 for each of the best stories (up to 4 to be selected)

> An interview with the winning authors on WAMC Northeast Public Radio in Albany, NY

About the Contest

> Open to all students in grades 9-12 from Connecticut, New York, and Vermont. Eligible students within that grade-range can be from public schools, private schools, and home schools.

> One entry per student. Entries must be authored by one individual only.

> Entries must have a minimum of 500 words to a maximum of 1600 words. The format must be double-spaced; 12-point font; 1-inch margins. Graphs, images, tables, and citations are optional, and would not count toward the length-limit.

> If sent by mail, entries must be post-marked no later than Friday, March 2, 2012. If sent electronically (pdf and doc files), the entry must be received no later than 5:00 PM EST on Friday, March 2, 2012. Results of the contest will be announced by mid-April 2012.

> Entries will be assessed by a team of (i) high school teachers with expertise in the sciences, literature, and the arts, and (ii) scientists associated with the New York Center for Astrobiology.

The short stories can range from being highly scientific to being fictional. The intent is to select up to two entries per Story Option, in which one may be highly scientific and the other may be highly fictional. In both instances, each would have been judged to be of outstanding quality. The contest-organizers fully recognize that the assessment criteria (described on page 3) will yield disparate scores for these two styles of short story. That range of scores will be calibrated by the team of reviewers.

To Enter

Mail a printout of your entry with the cover sheet to the following address: Prof. John W. Delano; Associate Director, New York Center for Astrobiology; Dept. of Atmospheric & Environmental Sciences; 1400 Washington Avenue; University at Albany; Albany, NY 12222 Alternatively, you can submit your entry as an e-mail attachment (.doc or .pdf) to Prof. John Delano at the following address: jdelano@albany.edu

Questions

For questions about this contest, please contact Professor John Delano by either telephone (518-442-4479) or e-mail (jdelano@albany.edu).