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Junior Café Scientifique – Going into Orbit: Famous Rocket Payloads and What We Learn from Them – Saturday, May 19

Tuesday, May 15th, 2012

Greetings fellow astrophiles!

A TACNY-hosted (Technology Alliance of CNY, of which the SAS is a member organization) Junior Café Scientifique lecture at the MOST is happening on Saturday May 19 at 9:30 a.m. More so, the SAS is in charge of the lecturing duties for this event in time for the TACNY Rocketry Competition coming up. Information is below.

When: Saturday, May 19, 9:30-11:00am
Where: Milton J Rubenstein Museum of Science & Technology (MOST), Syracuse NY

Damian G. Allis, PhD, research assistant professor of Chemistry at Syracuse University and president of the Syracuse Astronomical Society, will present Going into Orbit: Famous Rocket Payloads and What We Learn from Them, a talk about rocket payloads, as part of TACNY’s 2011-2012 Junior Cafe Scientifique lecture series.

People interested in learning more about rocket payloads are invited to attend the free Junior Cafe presentation on Saturday, May 19, 2012, from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Milton J. Rubenstein Museum of Science and Technology (MOST) in Syracuse’s Armory Square. Walk-ins are welcome, but we ask that people RSVP by emailing jrcafe@tacny.org by May 17, 2012.

Allis is a research professor at Syracuse University, focusing on spectroscopy and drug design; works in the area of molecular nanotechnology as part of the international Nanofactory Collaboration; and studies DNA and genomics with AptaMatrix Inc. in Syracuse. He currently is president and webmaster of the Syracuse Astronomical Society, an organization that promotes observation, education, and light pollution issues from its Darling Hill Observatory in Vesper. During cloudy nights, he also is a drummer/percussionist in several local bands, including the Civil War-Era Excelsior Cornet Band.

With 2,500 years of documented history as toys, military tools and delivery systems for scientists’ instruments, rocketry has changed the face of humankind. Rocketry not only opened the imaginations of authors in the 20th century to the universe, but profoundly changed telecommunications, surveillance, geopolitics, education, and observational astronomy. The early 21st century has found governments having to collaborate on development and delivery at the same time as industry is developing new, competitive, commercial alternatives to orbit for equipment and humans alike. This lecture will take a science-centric look at the use of rocketry in recent history and consider some of the radical change that has come from its science and application.

TACNY Junior Cafe Scientifique, a program for middle-school students, features discussions between scientists and students about topics in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics in an informal atmosphere and seeks to encourage students to consider careers in these areas. Students must be accompanied by an adult and can explore the MOST at no cost after the event.

For more information about TACNY, visit www.tacny.org.

TACNY Sweet Lecture – Biometrics: Automated Human Measurement for Security and Convenience – Tuesday, April 10 At 5:30 p.m.

Saturday, March 31st, 2012

Greetings fellow astrophiles!

A TACNY (Technology Alliance of CNY, of which the SAS is a member organization) John Edson Sweet Lecture is happening on the OCC campus on Tuesday, April 10. Information from the TACNY website for “Biometrics: Automated Human Measurement for Security and Convenience” is provided below.

When: Tuesday, April 10, 2012, at 5:30 pm
Where: Whitney Applied Technology Center Room 101 at Onondaga Community College

Stephanie Schuckers, PhD, an associate professor at Clarkson University, will present Biometrics: Automated Human Measurements for Security and Convenience, a talk about using biometrics for automated identification of people, as part of the the Technology Alliance of Central New York’s 2011-2012 Sweet Lecture Series.

People interested in learning more about biometrics and its future are invited to attend the free Sweet Lecture presentation on Tuesday, April 10, 2012, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. in Room 101 of the Whitney Applied Technology Center on the Onondaga Community College campus. Networking starts at 5:30 p.m., the speaker is introduced at 6 p.m., the presentation is slated to run from 6:15 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., and the event ends at 8 p.m. following questions from the audience. Admission is free and open to the public. Walk-ins are welcome, but we ask that people RSVP by emailing sweet.lecture@tacny.org by April 5, 2012.

Schuckers is an associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Clarkson University and serves as the Director of the Center of Identification Technology Research (CITeR), a National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center. She received her doctoral degree in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan. Schuckers’ research focuses on processing and interpreting signals that arise from the human body. Her work is funded from various sources, including National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Department of Homeland Security, the Center for Identification Technology and private industry.

CITeR is a multi-university research center involving Clarkson University, West Virginia University, University of Arizona, University of Buffalo, Michigan State University and St. Lawrence University. The center advances the performance of biometric systems and credibility assessment systems by enabling technologies, interdisciplinary training of scientists and engineers, and facilitation of new technology transfer to the private and government sectors.

Schuckers’ talk will focus on the state of the art of biometrics for automated recognition of individuals, as well as discuss the outlook for the next decade. She will also describe her research to minimize vulnerability in biometric systems, through the development of algorithms to reduce risk of spoofing, i.e. using fake biometric artifacts.

To help us plan, please email your RSVP.

We look forward to seeing you there – please pass the word!

Junior Café Scientifique – Antarctica Before the Ice: How Global Climate Change Affects Marine Ecology – Saturday, March 10

Tuesday, March 6th, 2012

Greetings fellow astrophiles!

A TACNY-hosted (Technology Alliance of CNY, of which the SAS is a member organization) Junior Café Scientifique lecture at the MOST is happening on Saturday March 10 at 9:30 a.m. Information is below.

When: Saturday, March 10, 9:30-11:00am (NOTE: not the usual third Saturday of the month)
Where: Milton J Rubenstein Museum of Science & Technology (MOST), Syracuse NY

Linda C. Ivany, an associate professor of earth sciences at Syracuse University, will present Antarctica Before the Ice: How Global Climate Change Affects Marine Ecology, a talk about the threat of global warming to Antarctica, as part of TACNY’s 2011-2012 Junior Cafe Scientifique lecture series.People interested in learning more about the impact of global warming are invited to attend the free Junior Cafe presentation on Saturday, March 10, 2012, from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Milton J. Rubenstein Museum of Science and Technology (MOST) in Syracuse’s Armory Square. Walk-ins are welcome, but we ask that people RSVP by emailing jrcafe@tacny.org by March 8, 2012.

Linda C. Ivany, PhD, is an associate professor of earth sciences at Syracuse University. She received her bachelor’s degree from Syracuse University, her master’s degree from the University of Florida, and her doctorate from Harvard University. She was a Michigan Society Fellow at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor for three years before moving to Syracuse in 2000. Ivany is a paleontologist and paleoclimatologist, using fossils to understand ancient environments, ecology, and climate change. She lives in Earlville on a farm with a multitude of animals.

Antarctica was not always covered in ice. Fifty million years ago, it was lush and forested, and the waters offshore were warm and teaming with life. As climate cooled, predators were eliminated from the marine ecosystem, resulting in the unique and fragile fauna that lives near the ice today. But global warming is threatening that ecosystem. If the water warms enough to allow predators to reinvade, the entire ecosystem will be changed forever. Learn more by attending Dr. Ivany’s talk.

TACNY Junior Cafe Scientifique, a program for middle-school students, features discussions between scientists and students about topics in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics in an informal atmosphere and seeks to encourage students to consider careers in these areas. Students must be accompanied by an adult and can explore the MOST at no cost after the event.

For more information about TACNY, visit www.tacny.org.

TACNY Sweet Lecture – Nuclear Energy: Will It Survive? – March 13, 5:30 p.m.

Tuesday, March 6th, 2012

Greetings fellow astrophiles!

A TACNY (Technology Alliance of CNY, of which the SAS is a member organization) Sweet Lecture (not to be directly confused with a sweet TACNY Lecture) is happening on the OCC campus on Tuesday, March 13. Information from the TACNY website for “Nuclear Energy: Will It Survive?” is provided below.

When: Tuesday, March 13, 2012, at 5:30 pm
Where: Whitney Applied Technology Center Room 101 at Onondaga Community College

Stan Wilczek Jr., PE, author and assistant professor at Keuka College, will present Nuclear Energy: Will It Survive?, a talk about the future of nuclear energy in the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, as part of the the Technology Alliance of Central New York’s 2011-2012 Sweet Lecture Series. The Event is being cosponsored by the Syracuse Chapter of the IEEE Power and Energy Society.

People interested in learning more about nuclear energy are invited to attend the free Sweet Lecture presentation on Tuesday, March 13, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. in Room 101 of the Whitney Applied Technology Center on the Onondaga Community College campus. Networking starts at 5:30 p.m., the speaker is introduced at 6 p.m., the presentation is slated to run from 6:15 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., and the event ends at 8 p.m. following questions from the audience. Admission is free and open to the public. Walk-ins are welcome, but we ask that people RSVP by emailing sweet.lecture@tacny.org by March 8.

Stan Wilczek Jr. spent 30 years in the nuclear and utility industry and is currently an assistant professor of business and management at Keuka College. He earned a bachelor of science in nuclear engineering from SUNY Buffalo, an MBA from Syracuse University, and is a graduate of Harvard’s Advanced Management Program. The author of two novels, he lives in Central New York and is currently working on his next book.

Nuclear energy once promised to be an environmentally friendly, safe, abundant and economical supply of electricity that would be “too cheap to meter.” Though it appears to have been fading for decades, did last year’s accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Complex in Japan finally put an end to the nuclear dream? Will nuclear energy survive this latest test?

To help us plan, please email your RSVP.

We look forward to seeing you there – please pass the word!

TACNY Sweet Lecture – Forensic Science: Real-Life CSI – Tuesday, February 7

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012

Greetings fellow astrophiles!

A TACNY (Technology Alliance of CNY, of which the SAS is a member organization) Sweet Lecture (not to be directly confused with a sweet TACNY Lecture) is happening on the OCC campus this coming Tuesday (February 7). Information from the TACNY website for “Forensic Science: Real-Life CSI” is provided below.

When: Tuesday, February 7, 2012, at 5:30 pm
Where: Whitney Applied Technology Center Room 101 at Onondaga Community College

Anita Zannin, owner and forensic consultant at AZ Forensic Associates, will present Forensic Science: Real-Life CSI, a talk about forensic science and bloodstain pattern analysis, as part of the the Technology Alliance of Central New York’s 2011-2012 Sweet Lecture Series. The event is also sponsored by the Syracuse section of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

People interested in learning more about forensic science are invited to attend the free Sweet Lecture presentation on Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2012, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. in Room 101 of the Whitney Applied Technology Center on the Onondaga Community College campus. Networking starts at 5:30 p.m., the speaker is introduced at 6 p.m., the presentation is slated to run from 6:15 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., and the event ends at 8 p.m. following questions from the audience. Admission is free and open to the public. Walk-ins are welcome, but we ask that people RSVP by emailing sweet.lecture@tacny.org by Jan. 31, 2012.

Anita Zannin has been an expert witness in state and federal courts, and has worked on criminal and civil cases in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. She recently appeared on CNN’s “Anderson Cooper 360” talking about evidence used in the case of Warren Horinek, a former Fort Worth, Texas, police officer who was found guilty of killing his wife based on the testimony of a bloodstain pattern analysis expert, which others believe to be wrong. Zannin graduated magna cum laude from Buffalo State College with dual bachelors degrees in forensic chemistry and criminal justice. She earned her master’s degree in forensic science from Syracuse University’s College of Arts and Sciences, where she currently is an adjunct professor. She is also a visiting professor at Francisco Marroquin Law School in Guatemala. Zannin earned her certification as a competent forensic expert in bloodstain pattern interpretation from the Institute on the Physical Significance of Human Bloodstain Evidence, which only six people worldwide have earned.

Zannin will discuss the science of forensics and bloodstain pattern analysis, topics that have risen to prominence due to the popularity of television shows such as “CSI.” She will talk about how technology has transformed this field of investigation and share her thoughts on the future of forensic science. Zannin will also discuss some the many cases she has worked on.

To help us plan, please email your RSVP

We look forward to seeing you there – please pass the word!